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At risk alcohol consumption with smoking by national background: Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos.

TitleAt risk alcohol consumption with smoking by national background: Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsBandiera FC, Pérez-Stable EJ, Atem F, Caetano R, Vidot DC, Gellman MD, Navas-Nacher EL, Cai J, Talavera G, Schneiderman N, Kaplan R
JournalAddict Behav
Volume99
Pagination106087
Date Published2019 12
ISSN1873-6327
KeywordsAcculturation, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Alcohol Drinking, Binge Drinking, Caribbean Region, Central America, cigarette smoking, Cuba, Depression, Dominican Republic, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Mexican Americans, Middle Aged, Puerto Rico, Sex Factors, South America, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Tobacco smoking and binge or excess drinking are unhealthy behaviors that frequently co-occur. Studies of Hispanics/Latinos have mostly been of Mexican Americans although there are substantial differences in smoking and drinking by heritage background. Associated with co-use by 5 subpopulations.METHODS: Cross-sectional data of 16,412 Hispanics/Latinos from Miami, the Bronx, Chicago and San Diego collected between 2008 and 2011 as part of the HCHS/SOL were analyzed. Smoking and alcohol consumption and demographic data were measured by self-report. Prevalence of smoking and alcohol consumption and co-use were reported. Logistic regression models examined the odds of co-use of smoking and binge or excess alcohol use by Hispanic/Latino background group.RESULTS: Men of Cuban (10.3%), Puerto Rican (8.9%), and Mexican (8.9%) background had the highest prevalence of co-use of smoking and binge drinking compared to men of Central American (6.1%) and Dominican (6.6%) background. Women of Dominican (16.4%) and Puerto Rican (19.7%) background had the highest prevalence of binge drinking compared to women of Central American (10%) and Cuban (8%) background and Puerto Rican (34.1%) and Cuban (21.8%) women were the most likely to report current smoking compared to women of Central American (8.3%) and Mexican (10.4%) background. Acculturation was not associated with co-use among men and women. Elevated depressive symptoms were positively associated with smoking and binge drinking among men, OR = 1.5 [1.2-2.0], and women, OR = 1.5 [1.1-2.2]. Puerto Rican women had increased odds of co-use of smoking and binge or excess drinking compared to Mexican American women, OR = 3.2 [1.5-6.6].CONCLUSIONS: Puerto Rican and Dominican Latinas and Central American and South American men have a higher prevalence of co-use.

DOI10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.106087
Alternate JournalAddict Behav
PubMed ID31466016
MS#: 
0432
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published