Accessibility issues or difficulties with this website?
Call 919-962-2073 or email hchsadministration@unc.edu.

Associations of Lipid Levels and Cognition: Findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleAssociations of Lipid Levels and Cognition: Findings from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsLamar M, Durazo-Arvizu RA, Rodriguez CJ, Kaplan RC, Perera MJ, Cai J, Giacinto RAEspinoza, González HM, Daviglus ML
JournalJ Int Neuropsychol Soc
Volume26
Issue3
Pagination251-262
Date Published2020 03
ISSN1469-7661
KeywordsAged, Biomarkers, Cholesterol, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Cognition, Cognitive Dysfunction, Dyslipidemias, Female, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Statistical, Risk Factors, triglycerides, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Hispanics/Latinos in the United States are less aware of their cholesterol levels and have a higher burden of associated adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular outcomes than non-Latino whites. Investigations of the associations between cholesterol levels and cognition in this population have often occurred within the context of metabolic syndrome and are limited to select lipids despite the fact that triglycerides (TGs) may be more relevant to the health of Hispanics/Latinos.METHODS: Baseline data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, collected from 2008 to 2011, was used to investigate the associations of lipid levels (i.e., TG, total cholesterol, TC; low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, LDL-C and HDL-C) with cognition (i.e., learning, memory, verbal fluency, and digit symbol substitution, DSS), adjusting for relevant confounders.RESULTS: In 7413 participants ages 45 to 74 years from Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American backgrounds, separate, fully adjusted linear regression models revealed that TG levels were inversely associated with DSS performance; however, this relationship was no longer significant once additional cardiovascular disease risk factors were added to the model (p = .06). TC and LDL-C levels (separately) were positively associated with learning and verbal fluency regardless of adjustments (p-values < .05). Separate analyses investigating the effect modification by background and sex revealed a particularly robust association between TC levels and DSS performance for Puerto Ricans and Central Americans (albeit in opposite directions) and an inverse relationship between TG levels and DSS performance for women (p-values < .02).CONCLUSIONS: It is important to consider individual lipid levels and demographic characteristics when investigating associations between cholesterol levels and cognition in Hispanics/Latinos.

DOI10.1017/S1355617719001000
Alternate JournalJ Int Neuropsychol Soc
PubMed ID31543086
PubMed Central IDPMC7083682
Grant ListP30 ES010126 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P60 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
K01 AG040192 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0405
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published