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The associations between anthropometric measurements and left ventricular structure and function: the Echo-SOL Study.

TitleThe associations between anthropometric measurements and left ventricular structure and function: the Echo-SOL Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsPonce S, Allison MA, Swett K, Cai J, Desai AA, Hurwitz BE, Ni A, Schneiderman N, Shah SJ, Spevack DM, Talavera GA, Rodriguez CJ
JournalObes Sci Pract
Volume4
Issue4
Pagination387-395
Date Published2018 Aug
ISSN2055-2238
Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study is to determine associations between anthropometry and echocardiographic measures of cardiac structure and function in Hispanic/Latinos.Methods: A total of 1,824 participants from ECHO-SOL were included. We evaluated associations between echocardiographic measures of left ventricular structure and function and anthropometric measures using multivariable-adjusted linear and logistic regression models adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors.Results: The mean age was 56 ± 0.17 years, 57% were women. The mean body mass index (BMI) was 30 ± 9.4 kg m, waist circumference (WC) was 100 ± 18 cm, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) was 0.93 ± 0.15. Adjusted analysis showed that 5-unit increment in BMI and 5-cm increase in WC was associated with 3.4 ± 0.6 and 1.05 ± 0.05 g m ( < 0.05 for both) higher left ventricular (LV) mass index, respectively. Similarly, 0.1-unit increment in WHR was associated with 2.0 ± 0.16 g m higher LV mass index ( < 0.01). WHR was associated with 0.22 ± 0.08% decrease in ejection fraction ( < 0.05). Concomitantly, 5-unit increment in BMI and WC was associated with increased odds of abnormal LV geometry (odds ratio 1.40 and 1.16,  = 0.03 and <0.01, respectively); 0.1-unit increment in WHR was associated with increased odds of abnormal LV geometry (odds ratio 1.51,  < 0.01).Conclusions: Among Hispanic/Latinos, higher anthropometric measures were associated with adverse cardiac structure and function.

DOI10.1002/osp4.279
Alternate JournalObes Sci Pract
PubMed ID30151233
PubMed Central IDPMC6105700
MS#: 
0222
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published