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Prescription Opioid Use Among Hispanics/Latinos With Arthritis Symptoms: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitlePrescription Opioid Use Among Hispanics/Latinos With Arthritis Symptoms: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsPerez HR, Starrels JL, Gonzalez S, Vidot DC, Hua S, Strizich GM, Zeng D, Daviglus M, Gellman MD, Kaplan RC
JournalHisp Health Care Int
Volume18
Issue1
Pagination12-19
Date Published2020 03
ISSN1938-8993
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Analgesics, Opioid, Arthritis, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, language, Male, Mexico, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Pain, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Prescription Drugs, United States
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: To determine the prevalence of prescription opioid (PO) use among Hispanics/Latinos with arthritis symptoms and to characterize how demographic and cultural factors are associated with PO use.METHOD: Cross-sectional analysis of baseline visit data during 2008 to 2011 from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, a population-based cohort study of 16,415 Hispanics/Latinos living in Chicago, Illinois, Miami, Florida, Bronx, New York, and San Diego, California. Included participants self-reported painful inflammation or swelling in one or more joints. Multivariate models controlling for physical and mental health scores were constructed to assess how demographic and cultural factors were associated with PO use.RESULTS: A total of 9.3% were using POs at the time of the baseline visit. In multivariate models, persons of Cuban background (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI; 0.21, 0.81]) and of Dominican background (AOR = 0.38, 95% CI [0.18, 0.80]) were significantly less likely to use POs compared with a reference group of persons of Mexican background. Greater language acculturation was also negatively associated with PO use (AOR = 0.68, 95% CI [0.53, 0.87]).CONCLUSION: POs were used relatively uncommonly, and use showed marked variation between Hispanic/Latino groups. Future study should determine mechanisms for why greater use of English among Hispanics/Latinos might influence PO use.

DOI10.1177/1540415319881755
Alternate JournalHisp Health Care Int
PubMed ID31674199
PubMed Central IDPMC7012704
Grant ListK23 DA044327 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
K24 DA046309 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
R01 DA039046 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0642
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Affiliated Investigator - Not at HCHS/SOL site
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published