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Elucidating the Multidimensionality of Socioeconomic Status in Relation to Metabolic Syndrome in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

TitleElucidating the Multidimensionality of Socioeconomic Status in Relation to Metabolic Syndrome in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsKhambaty T, Schneiderman N, Llabre MM, Elfassy T, Moncrieft AE, Daviglus M, Talavera GA, Isasi CR, Gallo LC, Reina SA, Vidot D, Heiss G
JournalInt J Behav Med
Volume27
Issue2
Pagination188-199
Date Published2020 Apr
ISSN1532-7558
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, blood pressure, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Metabolic syndrome, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Public Health, Risk Factors, Social Class, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Socioeconomic (SES) factors underlying disparities in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and consequently, type 2 diabetes among Hispanics/Latino populations are of considerable clinical and public health interest. However, incomplete and/or imprecise measurement of the multidimensional SES construct has impeded a full understanding of how SES contributes to disparities in metabolic disease. Consequently, a latent-variable model of the SES-MetSyn association was investigated and compared with the more typical proxy-variable model.METHODS: A community-based cross-sectional probability sample (2008-2011) of 14,029 Hispanic/Latino individuals of Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American, South American, and Mexican ancestry living in the USA was used. SES proxy's education, income, and employment were examined as effect indicators of a latent variable, and as individual predictors. MetSyn was defined using 2009 harmonized guidelines, and MetSyn components were also examined individually.RESULTS: In multivariate regression analyses, the SES latent variable was associated with 9% decreased odds of MetSyn (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 0.96, P < .001) and was associated with all MetSyn components, except diastolic blood pressure. Additionally, greater income, education, and employment status were associated with 4%, 3%, and 24% decreased odds of having MetSyn, respectively (Ps < .001). The income-MetSyn association was only significant for women and those with current health insurance.CONCLUSIONS: Hispanic/Latinos exhibit an inverse association between SES and MetSyn of varying magnitudes across SES variables. Public health research is needed to further probe these relationships, particularly among Hispanic/Latina women, to ultimately improve healthcare access to prevent diabetes in this underserved population.

DOI10.1007/s12529-020-09847-y
Alternate JournalInt J Behav Med
PubMed ID31933127
PubMed Central IDPMC7375751
Grant ListN01-HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR002737 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007426 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC25233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL07426 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0449
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published