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Associations between perceived neighborhood environment and cognitive function among middle-aged and older women and men: Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

TitleAssociations between perceived neighborhood environment and cognitive function among middle-aged and older women and men: Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsEstrella ML, Durazo-Arvizu RA, Gallo LC, Isasi CR, Perreira KM, Vu T-HT, Vásquez E, Sachdeva S, Zeng D, Llabre MM, Tarraf W, González HM, Daviglus ML, Lamar M
JournalSoc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol
Volume55
Issue6
Pagination685-696
Date Published2020 Jun
ISSN1433-9285
KeywordsAged, Cognition, Crime, Cross-Sectional Studies, Depression, Female, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Interpersonal Relations, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Residence Characteristics, Social Capital, Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine cross-sectional associations between perceived neighborhood environment and cognitive function among middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latino women and men.METHODS: Data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (2008-2011) and its Sociocultural Ancillary Study (2009-2010) were used. Participants were Hispanic/Latino women (n = 1812) and men (n = 1034) aged 45-74 years. Survey-weighted linear regression models were used to examine associations between self-reported perceived neighborhood environment (i.e., neighborhood social cohesion and problems categorized as quintiles, and neighborhood safety from crime categorized as low, medium, or high) with cognitive function (i.e., global cognition, verbal learning, memory, verbal fluency, and processing speed scores) in women and men. Final model adjusted for age, Hispanic/Latino background, language, field site, household income, education, years lived in neighborhood, and depressive symptoms.RESULTS: Women in the lowest quintile of perceived neighborhood problems (vs. highest quintile) had higher global cognition (β 0.48, 95% CI 0.03, 0.94, p trend 0.229) and memory scores (0.60, 95% CI 0.11, 1.09, p trend: 0.060). Women in the highest quintile of perceived neighborhood social cohesion (vs. lowest quintile) had lower global cognition (β - 0.56, 95% CI - 1.02, - 0.09, p trend 0.004), verbal learning (B - 1.01, 95% CI - 2.00, - 0.03, p trend 0.015), verbal fluency (B - 2.00, 95% CI - 3.83, - 0.16, p trend 0.006), and processing speed (B - 2.11, 95% CI - 3.87, - 0.36, p trend 0.009). There was no association between perceived neighborhood safety from crime and cognition among women, or between any perceived neighborhood environment measure and cognition among men.CONCLUSIONS: Middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latina women living in neighborhoods with the lowest perceived problems had higher global cognition and memory. Women living in neighborhoods with the highest perceived social cohesion had lower global cognition, verbal learning, verbal fluency, and processing speed.

DOI10.1007/s00127-019-01829-0
Alternate JournalSoc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol
PubMed ID31974810
PubMed Central IDPMC7276286
Grant ListR01 AG048642 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL125294 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
L60 MD015551 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
75N92019D00012 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R56 AG048642 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300003C / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG04864 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0687
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Manuscript Status: 
Published