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Are sedentary behavior and physical activity independently associated with cardiometabolic benefits? The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleAre sedentary behavior and physical activity independently associated with cardiometabolic benefits? The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsMossavar-Rahmani Y, Hua S, Qi Q, Strizich G, Sotres-Alvarez D, Talavera GA, Evenson KR, Gellman MD, Stoutenberg M, Castañeda SF, Gallo LC, Perreira KM, Sanchez-Johnsen LAP, Kaplan RC
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume20
Issue1
Pagination1400
Date Published2020 Sep 14
ISSN1471-2458
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cohort Studies, exercise, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Middle Aged, Public Health, Risk Factors, Sedentary Behavior, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Whether physical activity can reduce cardiometabolic risk particularly in understudied populations such as US Hispanics/Latinos is of public health interest. We prospectively examined the association of physical activity and cardiometabolic biomarkers in n = 8049 participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, a community-based cohort study of 16,415 adults aged 18-74 yr who self-identified as Hispanic/Latino from four US urban centers.METHODS: We assessed physical activity using accelerometry in 2008-2011 at visit 1. We assessed cardiometabolic biomarkers twice: once at visit 1 and collected a second measure in 2014-2017 at visit 2. We used survey linear regression models with changes in cardiometabolic markers as the dependent variables and quartiles of sedentary behavior or whether adults met guidelines for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity as the independent variables.RESULTS: In normoglycemic adults without cardiovascular disease, but not in adults with evidence of cardiometabolic disease, those who were in the lowest quartile for sedentary behavior (< 10.08 h/day) had a significant decline in mean LDL-cholesterol of - 3.94 mg/dL (95% CI: - 6.37, - 1.52) compared to adults in the highest quartile (≥13.0 h/day) who exhibited a significant increase in LDL-cholesterol of 0.14 mg/dL (95% CI, - 2.15,2.42) over the six year period (P < 0.02 in fully adjusted models.) There was also a trend toward lower mean increase in HbA1c comparing the lowest with the highest quartile of sedentary behavior. Overall regardless of glycemic level or evidence of cardiometabolic disease, adults who met guidelines for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity at visit 1, had significantly lower mean increases in level of fasting glucose compared to adults not meeting guidelines in fully adjusted models.CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of Hispanics/Latinos, being free of cardiometabolic disease and having low levels of sedentary behavior were associated with health benefits. Among all adults regardless of cardiometabolic disease, meeting guidelines for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was associated with health benefits. Overall these data suggest that an active lifestyle may blunt the association of advancing age with worsening cardiometabolic risk factors.

DOI10.1186/s12889-020-09497-5
Alternate JournalBMC Public Health
PubMed ID32928159
PubMed Central IDPMC7490882
Grant ListP30 AG066615 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG055527 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
16SFRN27940007 / / American Heart Association /
P30 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01HL136266 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0529
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published