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A longitudinal analysis of nondaily smokers: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

TitleA longitudinal analysis of nondaily smokers: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsKlugman M, H Hosgood D, Hua S, Xue X, Vu T-HT, Perreira KM, Castañeda SF, Cai J, Pike JR, Daviglus M, Kaplan RC, Isasi CR
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume49
Pagination61-67
Date Published2020 09
ISSN1873-2585
KeywordsAcculturation, Adolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Aged, Anxiety, Depression, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Sex Distribution, Smokers, smoking cessation, Tobacco Smoking, Tobacco Use Disorder, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

PURPOSE: Nondaily smoking is increasing in the United States and common among Hispanic/Latino smokers. We characterized factors related to longitudinal smoking transitions in Hispanic/Latino nondaily smokers.METHODS: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos is a population-based cohort study of Hispanics/Latinos aged 18-74 years. Multinomial logistic regression assessed the baseline factors (2008-2011) associated with follow-up smoking status (2014-2017) in nondaily smokers (n = 573), accounting for complex survey design.RESULTS: After ∼6 years, 41% of nondaily smokers became former smokers, 22% became daily smokers, and 37% remained nondaily smokers. Factors related to follow-up smoking status were number of days smoked in the previous month, household smokers, education, income, and insurance. Those smoking 16 or more of the last 30 days had increased risk of becoming a daily smoker [vs. < 4 days; relative risk ratio (RRR) = 5.65, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.96-16.33]. Greater education was inversely associated with transitioning to daily smoking [>high school vs. CONCLUSIONS: Many Hispanic/Latino nondaily smokers became daily smokers, which may increase their risk of adverse health outcomes. Addressing different smoking patterns in primary care may be useful to prevent smoking-related diseases.

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.06.007
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID32951805
PubMed Central IDPMC7506143
Grant ListP30 AG066615 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR002556 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0885
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published