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Associations of Sleep-disordered Breathing and Insomnia with Incident Hypertension and Diabetes. The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleAssociations of Sleep-disordered Breathing and Insomnia with Incident Hypertension and Diabetes. The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2021
AuthorsLi X, Sotres-Alvarez D, Gallo LC, Ramos AR, Avilés-Santa L, Perreira KM, Isasi CR, Zee PC, Savin KL, Schneiderman N, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Sofer T, Daviglus M, Redline S
JournalAm J Respir Crit Care Med
Volume203
Issue3
Pagination356-365
Date Published2021 02 01
ISSN1535-4970
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Cardiometabolic Risk Factors, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Sex Factors, Sleep Apnea Syndromes, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

Sleep disorders are associated with hypertension and diabetes, which are primary risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and mortality. It is important to understand these associations in Hispanic/Latino individuals, in whom cardiovascular death is the leading cause of mortality. To investigate the prospective associations of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and insomnia with incident hypertension and diabetes among U.S. Hispanic/Latino people over 6 years of follow-up and to assess potential sex differences in these associations. Data from 11,623 Hispanic/Latino participants in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (visit 1, 2008-2011; visit 2, 2014-2017) were analyzed using survey logistic regression models, adjusting for potential confounders. SDB (apnea-hypopnea index of 5 or more) and insomnia (Women's Health Initiative Insomnia Rating Scale of 9 or more) were measured at baseline. Incident hypertension (stage 2 or greater) and diabetes were defined according to national guidelines. In the target population, 52.6% were women, with a mean age of 41.1 ± 14.9 years at baseline. SDB was associated with 1.54 higher adjusted odds of incident hypertension (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.00) and 1.33 higher odds of incident diabetes (95% CI, 1.05-1.67) compared with no SDB. Insomnia was associated with incident hypertension (odds ratio, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.11-1.69) but not with diabetes. The association between insomnia and incident hypertension was stronger among men than among women. SDB was associated with incident hypertension and diabetes. Insomnia was associated with incident hypertension. These findings support the importance of sleep disorders as modifiable targets for disease prevention and reduction.

DOI10.1164/rccm.201912-2330OC
Alternate JournalAm J Respir Crit Care Med
PubMed ID32758008
PubMed Central IDPMC7874314
Grant ListP30 AG066615 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R35 HL135818 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR002550 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
P60 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0752
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Sleep Center - Harvard Medical School/The Brigham & Women's Hospital
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Sleep Center - Harvard Medical School/The Brigham & Women's Hospital
Manuscript Status: 
Published