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Targeting family functioning, acculturative stress, and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption for obesity prevention: findings from the Hispanic community children's health study/study of Latino youth.

TitleTargeting family functioning, acculturative stress, and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption for obesity prevention: findings from the Hispanic community children's health study/study of Latino youth.
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsFigueroa R, Isasi CR, Perreira KM, McClain AC, Gallo LC, Sotres-Alvarez D, Delamater AM, Daviglus M, Van Horn L, Mattei J
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume20
Issue1
Pagination1546
Date Published2020 Oct 14
ISSN1471-2458
KeywordsAcculturation, Adolescent, Beverages, Child, Child Health, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Obesity, Sugar-Sweetened Beverages
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Maintaining a bond with one's family as well coping with stress while acculturating to the US may protect Hispanic/Latino youth from increased sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) consumption, which heightens the risk for overweight and obesity. This study aims to examine associations between acculturative stress, family functioning, and SSB consumption by acculturation status among U.S. Hispanic/Latino youth.METHODS: With cross-sectional data on 1465 youth 8-16y (49.6% females) participating in the Hispanic Community Children's Health Study/Study of Latino Youth, we classified youths into four acculturation groups - assimilated, integrated, marginalized/separated, and unclassified. SSB consumption was assessed through two 24-h diet recalls and defined as intake frequency of soda, fruit juice, sweetened soft and fruit drinks. Multi-group path regression models were used to test associations of Hispanic/Latino youth' acculturative stress and family functioning with SSB consumption, as well as the moderating role of acculturation status.RESULTS: When controlling for age, sex, and study site, acculturative stress (β = - 0.13, p = 0.01) was inversely associated with SSB, and poor family functioning (β = 0.11, p = 0.07) was only marginally associated with SSB consumption among youth classified as assimilated but not among youth classified as integrated, marginalized/separated, or unclassified.CONCLUSIONS: A socio-ecological perspective that incorporates the role of key acculturation-related factors across multiple levels may aid efforts to identify mechanisms that influence the relationship between acculturation status and diet among Hispanic/Latino youth and their families.

DOI10.1186/s12889-020-09658-6
Alternate JournalBMC Public Health
PubMed ID33054741
PubMed Central IDPMC7559747
Grant ListN01-HC65234 / NH / NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / NH / NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / NH / NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
K01 HL150406 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / NH / NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
T32DK007703 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / NH / NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR002550 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0794
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Affiliated Investigator - Not at HCHS/SOL site
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published