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Healthful eating patterns, serum metabolite profile and risk of diabetes in a population-based prospective study of US Hispanics/Latinos.

TitleHealthful eating patterns, serum metabolite profile and risk of diabetes in a population-based prospective study of US Hispanics/Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2022
AuthorsChen G-C, Chai JChoul, Xing J, Moon J-Y, Shan Z, Yu B, Mossavar-Rahman Y, Sotres-Alvarez D, Li J, Mattei J, Daviglus ML, Perkins DL, Burk RD, Boerwinkle E, Kaplan RC, Hu FB, Qi Q
JournalDiabetologia
Volume65
Issue7
Pagination1133-1144
Date Published2022 07
ISSN1432-0428
KeywordsAdult, Diabetes Mellitus, diet, Diet, Mediterranean, Feeding Behavior, Hispanic or Latino, Humans, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors
Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We aimed to evaluate associations of multiple recommended dietary patterns (i.e. the alternate Mediterranean diet [aMED], the Healthy Eating Index [HEI]-2015 and the healthful Plant-based Diet Index [hPDI]) with serum metabolite profile, and to examine dietary-pattern-associated metabolites in relation to incident diabetes.METHODS: We included 2842 adult participants free from diabetes, CVD and cancer during baseline recruitment of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Metabolomics profiling of fasting serum was performed using an untargeted approach. Dietary pattern scores were derived using information collected by two 24 h dietary recalls. Dietary-pattern-associated metabolites were identified using multivariable survey linear regressions and their associations with incident diabetes were assessed using multivariable survey Poisson regressions with adjustment for traditional risk factors.RESULTS: We identified eight metabolites (mannose, γ/β-tocopherol, N1-methylinosine, pyrraline and four amino acids) that were inversely associated with all dietary scores. These metabolites were detrimentally associated with various cardiometabolic risk traits, especially insulin resistance. A score comprised of these metabolites was associated with elevated risk of diabetes (RR 1.54 [95% CI 1.29, 1.83]), and this detrimental association appeared to be attenuated or eliminated by having a higher score for aMED (p = 0.0001), HEI-2015 (p = 0.020) or hPDI (p = 0.023). For example, RR (95% CI) of diabetes for each SD increment in the metabolite score was 1.99 (1.44, 2.37), 1.67 (1.17, 2.38) and 1.08 (0.86, 1.34) across the lowest to the highest tertile of aMED score, respectively.CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Various recommended dietary patterns were inversely related to a group of metabolites that were associated with elevated risk of diabetes. Adhering to a healthful eating pattern may attenuate or eliminate the detrimental association between metabolically unhealthy serum metabolites and risk of diabetes.

DOI10.1007/s00125-022-05690-w
Alternate JournalDiabetologia
PubMed ID35357561
Grant ListR01 DK112940 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01HL060712 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL140976 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK120870 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK046200 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01DK119268 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
UM1 HG008898 / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K01 HL129892 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL136266 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0801
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Ancillary Study Investigators - Not at HCHS/SOL site
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published