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Joint associations of insomnia and sleep duration with prevalent diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

TitleJoint associations of insomnia and sleep duration with prevalent diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
Publication TypePublication
Year2016
AuthorsCespedes EM, Dudley KA, Sotres-Alvarez D, Zee PC, Daviglus ML, Shah NA, Talavera GA, Gallo LC, Mattei J, Qi Q, Ramos AR, Schneiderman N, Espinoza-Giacinto RA, Patel SR
JournalJ Diabetes
Volume8
Issue3
Pagination387-97
Date Published2016 May
ISSN1753-0407
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Inadequate sleep quantity and quality are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. This relationship is not well-examined in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos, and prior analyses may be confounded by sleep apnea. This cross-sectional study examined joint associations of sleep duration and insomnia with diabetes among diverse U.S. Hispanic/Latinos.METHODS: Baseline data on sleep quantity and quality were obtained from 15,227 participants (mean age 41; range 18-74 years) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Complex survey multinomial logistic regression was used to examine associations between prevalent diabetes and six phenotypes defined by cross-classifying sleep duration (short ≤6 h, average >6-9 h, long >9 h) and insomnia, adjusting for sex, age, site and Hispanic/Latino background interaction, education, physical activity, diet quality, and sleep apnea.RESULTS: In the weighted population, 14% had diabetes, 28% had insomnia, 9% were short sleepers, and 19% were long sleepers. Compared with those with average sleep and no insomnia, those with short sleep and insomnia were more likely to have diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02, 2.11). Average sleepers with insomnia (1.28; 95% CI 1.02, 1.61) and long sleepers without insomnia (1.33; 95% CI 1.07, 1.65) also had elevated odds of diabetes. Further adjustment for body mass index attenuated associations, except with long sleep without insomnia.CONCLUSIONS: Both decreased quantity and quality of sleep are associated with diabetes in Hispanic/Latinos, with the greatest odds among those with short sleep duration and insomnia. The association is largely explained by obesity.

DOI10.1111/1753-0407.12308
Alternate JournalJ Diabetes
PubMed ID25952169
PubMed Central IDPMC5021506
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR000461 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
K01 HL120951 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K23 HL125923 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32-DK007703 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 DK007703 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0255
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Sleep Center - Harvard Medical School/The Brigham & Women's Hospital
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published