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Diet quality, inflammation, and the ankle brachial index in adults with or without cardiometabolic conditions.

TitleDiet quality, inflammation, and the ankle brachial index in adults with or without cardiometabolic conditions.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsMattei J, Sotres-Alvarez D, Gellman M, Castañeda SF, Hu FB, Tucker KL, Siega-Riz AMaria, Kaplan RC
JournalClin Nutr
Volume37
Issue4
Pagination1332-1339
Date Published2018 08
ISSN1532-1983
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, ankle brachial index, Cohort Studies, diet, Female, Humans, Inflammation, Male, Middle Aged, Nutritive Value, Odds Ratio, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Diet quality may influence non-traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors - namely, C-reactive protein (CRP) and the ankle-brachial index (ABI). Pre-existing traditional cardiometabolic conditions may confound this association. We aimed to determine whether diet quality was associated with high-risk CRP or ABI, independently from traditional cardiometabolic risk factors.METHODS: Baseline data were analyzed from US-Hispanics/Latinos aged 18-74 y without previously-diagnosed CVD participating in the population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos cohort. Included were 14,623 participants with CRP data, and 7892 participants (≥45 y) with ABI data. Diet quality was measured with the Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI).RESULTS: Nearly 35% of Hispanics/Latinos had high-risk CRP concentration and 6.3% had high-risk ABI (peripheral artery disease (PAD): 4.2%; arterial stiffness: 2.1%). After adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity, the odds (95% confidence interval) of having high-risk ABI were 37% (5, 44%) lower per 10-unit increase in AHEI (p = 0.018). The association was marginally significant for PAD (0.77 (0.58, 1.00); p = 0.05), and non-significant for arterial stiffness (p = 0.16). Each 10-unit increase in AHEI was associated with 21% (10, 30%) lower odds of high-risk CRP (p = 0.0002) after similar adjustments. There were no significant interactions between AHEI and age, sex, ethnicity, smoking, or pre-existing cardiometabolic conditions for associations with ABI. The association between AHEI and high-risk CRP was stronger for those with diabetes (p-interaction < 0.0001), obesity (p-interaction = 0.005), or ages 45-74 y (p-interaction = 0.011).CONCLUSIONS: Higher diet quality is associated with lower inflammation and less adverse ABI among Hispanics/Latinos, independently from traditional cardiometabolic risk factors.

DOI10.1016/j.clnu.2017.06.003
Alternate JournalClin Nutr
PubMed ID28666597
PubMed Central IDPMC5722708
Grant ListK01 HL120951 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK046200 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0420
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Affiliated Investigator - Not at HCHS/SOL site
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published